First and Second Cases of Rare Childhood Syndrome Potentially Associated With COVID-19 Reported to DHHS

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News Release
 
For Immediate Release: 6/8/2020
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CONTACTS
Leah Bucco-White, Communications, (402) 309-4157,
leah.bucco-white@nebraska.gov
Khalilah LeGrand, Communications, (402) 853-1320,
khalilah.legrand@nebraska.gov

 

Lincoln – The first and second confirmed cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) were reported to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). MIS-C is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. One child is from Dawson County - https://www.facebook.com/2RPHD/. The other child is from Douglas County - https://www.douglascountyhealth.com/latest-news. Both are currently hospitalized.

“We don't know exactly what causes this syndrome, but we do know that many children diagnosed with it had COVID-19 or had been around someone with COVID-19," said Dr. Gary Anthone, Chief Medical Officer and Director of Public Health for DHHS. “The syndrome appears to be an uncommon manifestation potentially tied to COVID-19. It can be very serious, but most children diagnosed with the condition have gotten better with medical care."    

DHHS shared information on recognizing, managing and reporting potential cases of MIS-C with health care providers and local health departments across the state in a May 18 Health Alert Network advisory.

There is still a lot to learn about MIS-C and more study is needed. State and local health departments nationwide are working with federal partners to investigate cases and possible causes.

Fast facts about Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children:

  • MIS-C is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs.
  • Experts are working to determine the exact cause of MIS-C.
  • Many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19 or had been around someone with COVID-19.
  • Symptoms of MIS-C include fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes, feeling extra tired.
  • If parents see potential symptoms of MIS-C in their child, they should contact their health care provider immediately. 
  • MIS-C can be serious and there have been deaths associated with the syndrome, but most children diagnosed with MIS-C have gotten better with medical care according to the CDC.
  • Based on what is known about MIS-C, the best way to protect your child is by taking everyday actions to prevent your child and other household members from getting COVID-19 - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/children/protect-children.html
  • Parents or caregivers who have concerns about their child's health, including concerns about COVID-19 or MIS-C, should call a pediatrician or other healthcare provider right away. 

More information on MIS-C can be found on the CDC's website - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/children/mis-c.html.

For more information on COVID-19, go to www.dhhs.ne.gov/coronavirus.

 

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