Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program
Screening Saves Lives!

Client FAQs

What is the official name of the colon cancer screening demonstration project in Nebraska?

The official name of the Nebraska colon cancer screening program is the Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (NCP).  The NCP is a screening demonstration project and is one of only five in the nation.  The program must adhere to strict Federal guidelines for inclusion of clients, follow up and reporting standards.

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Is the new CRC program going to be a part of the Every Woman Matters program?  How and why?

Yes, the CRC program is part of the Every Woman Matters program and adheres to the same eligibility guidlines. Because EWM has already established hundreds contracts with providers across Nebraska, the EWM program is the most cost-effective and logical place for the colon cancer program to reside.

Men who are at least 50 years of age, meeting the same criteria as women enrolled in the Every Woman Matters (EWM) program, can now enroll in the NCP.           

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If both men and women are going to be targeted for the colorectal program, how are men eligible for the program, and do they follow the same guidelines as women do enrolling in EWM?

When women 50 through 64 years of age receive their annual rescreening packet, they will also receive an invitation to screen for colon cancer, and educational materials on colon cancer.  The invitation will provide the woman an opportunity to receive colon cancer screening information for herself as well as for another adult (male or female) over the age of 50. In this way, men will also be educated and screened. 

Once a health history and medical release are received, the program will determine, based on guidelines developed by the Every Woman Matters Medical Advisory Committee, which screenings the clients are eligible to recieve.  Not everyone who enrolled will be eligible for screening through NCP.

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Do I have to re-enroll in Every Woman Matters in order to enroll in the NebraskaColon Cancer Screening Program? How does this all work?

No, clients only need to enroll once in The Every Woman Matters Program. 

Participants of the Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program will need to re-enroll each year that they want to participate in the CRC program..

The enrollment into EWM also includes enrollment into the colon cancer screening program. It is important for clients to contact the Central Office when their name or address changes, so files can be updated.  If a client’s income or insurance status changes and she is no longer eligible according to the guidelines, her enrollment will be suspended until her income/insurance status changes and she again becomes eligible. 

Since the Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program is new, all participants will need to sign a new medical release form, and answer personal and family colon health history questions. Answers to these questions will decide whether the client is eligible to receive colon cancer screening services.

Anyone else who is not currently enrolled in the Every Woman Matters Program, over age 50 may also fill out an enrollment form, sign a medical release, and fill out a colon health history.  Once all appropriate paperwork is filled out and returned to the program, the program will determine eligibility into the program and which, if any, colon screening test the client is eligible for according to guidelines set by the Every Woman Matters Medical Advisory Committee.

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What is a Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT)?

A test that checks for hidden blood in the stool.  At home, using a small stick from a test kit, you place a small amount of your stool, from three different bowel movements three days in a row, on test cards.  You return the cards to a lab, where they’re checked for blood.  This test is recommended yearly.  If blood is found, guidelines indicate that a follow-up colonoscopy is recommended.

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What is a Flexible Sigmoidoscopy?

Before this test, you use a strong laxative and/or enema to clean out the colon.  Flexible sigmoidoscopy is conducted at the doctor’s office, clinic, or hospital.  The doctor uses a narrow, flexible, lighted tube to look at the inside of the rectum and the lower portion of the colon. During the exam, the doctor may remove some polyps (abnormal growths) and collect samples of tissue or cells for more testing.  This test is recommended every 5 years.  If polyps are found, guidelines indicate that  a follow-up colonoscopy is recommended.

When used together, FOBT is recommended yearly and a flexible sigmoidoscopy is recommended every 5 years.

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What is a Colonoscopy?

Before this test, you will take a strong laxative to cleanse the colon. Colonoscopy is conducted in a doctor’s office, clinic, or hospital.  You are given a sedative to make you more comfortable, while the doctor uses a narrow, flexible, lighted tube to look inside the rectum and the entire colon.  During the exam, the doctor may remove some polyps and collect samples of tissue or cells for more testing.  For clients over 50, this test is recommended every 10 years.

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What is a Double Contrast Barium Enema (DCBE)?

This test is conducted in a radiology center or hospital.  Before the test, you use a strong laxative and/or enema to clean out the colon.  This procedure involves taking x-rays of the rectum and colon after you are given an enema with a barium solution, followed by an injection of air.  The barium coats the lining of the intestines so that polyps and other abnormalities are visible on the x-ray.  This test is recommended every 5 years.

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Some tests may be recommended by your doctor more often, depending upon your risk.  Some insurance plans may help pay for screening tests for people age 50 years or older.  Many plans may help pay for screening tests for people under 50 who are at increased risk for colon cancer.  Check with your health insurance provider to determine your colon cancer screening benefits.  If you don’t have benefits to cover colon cancer screening the Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program may be able to help.

If you have additional questions, please email us.
We will add your question and its answer to this page.

 

For more information, contact:
Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program
301 Centennial Mall South, 3rd Floor
P.O. Box 94817
Lincoln, NE 68509-4817
In Lincoln:  (402) 471-0929
Outside Lincoln:  (800) 532-2227
Fax: (402) 471-0913 or (402) 742-2379
TDD: (800) 833-7352
E-mail: NCP@dhhs.ne.gov


 

Nebraska Colon Cancer Screening Program

Every Woman Matters

Office of Women's Health

Health & Wellness Page