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Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI)
     
Report of HAI Rates in Nebraska Hospitals
 

nebraska report thumbnailEach year the CDC creates an infographic progress report on each state's HAI performance. The definitions below are to assist in understanding this report.

What does CDC's progress report on Nebraska's HAI rates mean?

The front page of the report with the outline of a human body shows percentages of specific HAI rates in 2014 for Nebraska hospitals, compared to the national baseline (see below for national baseline information).

The second page shows a data table that highlights how Nebraska hospitals performed in 2014 compared to 2013. This table also compares Nebraska HAI performance in 2014 to the national averages in 2014. This more recent data is more relevant to what is going on now in our state.

  1.  Central line-associated blood infections (CLABSIs)
    • The rates of infection for CLABSIs has decreased in the past few years in Nebraska, but the rate of infection for CLABSIs in Nebraska has not decreased as fast as the current national average.
  2. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs)
    • The rate of infection for CAUTIs has slightly decreased in Nebraska, and the rate of infection for CAUTIs in Nebraska is a little bit better than the current national average - but infection rates remain high.
  3. Surgical site infections (SSIs)
    • Abdominal Hysterectomy
      • The rate of infection after hysterectomy surgery decreased in the past few years in Nebraska and the rate of infection after hysterectomy surgery in Nebraska is better than the current national average.
    • Colon Surgery
      • The rate of infection after colon surgery decreased slightly last year after rising in prior years. The rate of infection after colon surgery in Nebraska remains worse than the current national average.
  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections
    • The rate of infection for MRSA decreased in Nebraska, and the rate of infection for MRSA is lower than the current national average.
  5. C. difficile (C. diff) infections
    • The rate of infection for C. difficile increased in Nebraska in 2014, but the rate of infection for C. difficile is lower than the current national average.

What does the standardized infection ratio mean?

The SIR compares the number of infections in a facility or state to the number of infections that were predicted to occur based on national data from previous years. A state or facility‚Äôs SIR compares the number of infections reported in that time period to the predicted number of infections based on the standard population.
  • SIR less than 1: the number of infections was less than predicted
  • SIR is 1: the number of infections was about the same as predicted
  • SIR more than 1: the number of infections was more than predicted
SIRs are adjusted for risk factors that may impact the number of infections reported by a hospital, such as type of patient care location, bed size of the hospital, patient age, and other factors. The SIR is adjusted differently depending on the type of infection measured.
 
The national 2014 SIR is a summary statistic calculated from all reported HAIs that occurred in 2014. It is the total number of observed infections, divided by the total number of predicted infections in 2014. 

What is the national baseline?

The national baseline is used to predict the number of infections expected to occur in a hospital, state, or country. The national baseline is an estimate based on infections reported to NHSN during the following baseline periods:
  • 2006 to 2008: CLABSIs and SSIs
  • 2009: CAUTIs
  • 2010 to 2011: MRSA infection and C. diff infection
The number of predicted infections is risk adjusted and includes data from all facilities.
 

 
 
 
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