Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content


Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
     
Summary Ebola Facts and Resources

 
Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is one of numerous Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. It is a severe, often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (such as monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).
 
Ebola HF is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. When infection occurs, symptoms usually begin abruptly. The first Ebolavirus species was discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo near the Ebola River. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically.
 
There are five identified subspecies of Ebolavirus. Four of the five have caused disease in humans: Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus); Sudan virus (Sudan ebolavirus); Taï Forest virus (Taï Forest ebolavirus, formerly Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus); and Bundibugyo virus (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). The fifth, Reston virus (Reston ebolavirus), has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.
 
The natural reservoir host of ebolaviruses remains unknown. However, on the basis of available evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is zoonotic (animal-borne) with bats being the most likely reservoir. Four of the five subtypes occur in an animal host native to Africa.
 
A host of similar species is probably associated with Reston virus, which was isolated from infected cynomolgous monkeys imported to the United States and Italy from the Philippines. Several workers in the Philippines and in US holding facility outbreaks became infected with the virus, but did not become ill.
 
 
(All outside links open in a NEW browser window)
 
 
University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Links
 
 
 
 
 
 
Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Links
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
World Health Organization (WHO) Links
 
 
 
 
 
 
DHHS Ebola Health Alert Network Advisories
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nebraska DHHS
 
 
 
Office of Epidemiology
 
 
 
 
 
 
Documents in PDF PDF format require the use of Adobe Acrobat Reader,
which can be downloaded for free from
Adobe Systems, Inc.