West Nile Virus Surveillance Data

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Epidemiology and Informatics
Public Health
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What you need to know

The DHHS West Nile Virus Surveillance Program works to identify and prevent West Nile virus in Nebraska by

  • trapping mosquitoes,
  • collecting and testing dead birds, and
  • testing for human infection.

The Nebraska Department of Agriculture investigates any possible cases involving horses. For all human cases, the DHHS and the local public health departments conduct investigations.

Arbovirus Weekly Report

A weekly summary of Nebraska Arbovirus surveillance and mosquito monitoring.

Mosquito Weekly Report

A weekly summary of Nebraska Mosquito surveillance and mosquito monitoring.

2019 Data

2019 Humans

CategoryNumberMaps
Clinical Positive Individuals​22Clinical Positive 2019
Positive Blood Donors ​2Blood Donor Positive 2019
Cumulative Clinical and Blood Donor Cases​24


2019 Human Clinical Specifics

Age Range Number
0-13​1
14-25​2
26-50​10
51-64​8
65+​1
Gender
Male​8
Female​14
Diagnosis
WNV Neuroinvasive​13
WN Non-Neuroinvasive​9
Hospitalized​5
Deaths​1


2019 Animals

Surveillance
Type
Number
Reported
Number
Tested
Number
Positives
Maps
Dead Birds6251
Mosquito Pools

 

2,682

29 positive WNV

3 positive SLE

Mosquito 2019
Equines0NA 0


 

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2018 Data

2018 Humans

CategoryNumberMaps
Clinical Positive Individuals​251Clinical Positive 2018
Positive Blood Donors​46Donors 2018
Cumulative Clinical and Blood Donor Cases​288


2018 Human Clinical Specifics

Age Range Number
0-131
14-2516
26-5094
51-6470
65+70
Gender
Male145
Female106
Diagnosis
WNV Neuro invasive124
​WNV Non-Neuro invasive​127
Hospitalized​113
​Deaths​12


 

2018 Animals

Surveillance
Type
Number
Reported
Number
Tested
Number
Positives
Maps
Dead Birds13881
Mosquito Pools2,577

122 positive WNV 

0 positive SLE

Mosquito 2018
Equines2NA 2Equine 2018


 

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Dead Birds

Testing criteria for dead birds in Nebraska require only birds that have been dead less than 24 hours. We accept birds in the crow family (corvids), fledgling age and older, for testing. Birds will only be accepted from counties for testing until the local public health department finds a West Nile Virus-positive bird or mosquito in their jurisdiction. Please provide specific date and address information (including county and zip code) for birds you submit for testing.

Mosquitoes

We collect adult mosquitoes every two weeks from routine surveillance sites around the state. DHHS personnel may perform supplemental mosquito trapping as needed. A mosquito sample is all mosquitoes from one CDC-miniature light trap ran for one night at a single location. The first task is to sort the samples. Then, we identify female (blood feeding) mosquitoes to species and count them. We pool the mosquitoes in the genus Culex in vials that contain up to 50 mosquitoes of the same species. The last step is to send them for testing for West Nile virus.

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Image of a mosquito trap

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Close up image of a mosquito trap

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Image of a New Jersey light trap