COVID-19 Traveler Recommendations

 
 
 
 
 
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What you need to know

Travelers

When to self-quarantine and self-monitor for travelers:

    • Returning international travelers are no longer required to self-quarantine and self-monitor for 14 days upon return/arrival. However, several countries are seeing increasing cases of COVID-19 and we continue to recommend that travelers practice strict social distancing and self-monitor for symptoms. If symptoms develop, individuals should isolate immediately.

When to practice strict social distancing and self-monitor for travelers:

    • Out-of-state travelers and others traveling within Nebraska (e.g., commuters) should practice strict social distancing and self-monitor for symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Individuals that develop symptoms should immediately self-isolate.

Definitions

  • Self-Quarantine: persons with known or potential exposure to a person with COVID-19 infection should remove themselves from situations where others could be exposed/infected should they develop infection and be self or actively monitored.
  • Self-Monitor: monitor yourself for symptoms consistent with COVID-19 infection, including cough, shortness of breath, fever, sore throat, and fatigue. Persons with known exposure to COVID-19 infection are asked to check for symptoms including fever twice daily (e.g., 8 am and 8 pm). Persons with COVID-19 infection should document symptoms to enable accurate determination of duration of isolation.
  • Self-Isolate: persons who develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (e.g. cough, shortness of breath, fever, loss of taste or smell) should eliminate contact with others.
  • Social Distancing: minimize interactions in crowded spaces by working from home, closing schools/switching to online classes, cancelling/postponing conferences and large meetings, and keeping individuals spaced at least 6 feet apart.
  • Close Contact: an individual who has been 6 feet (2 meters) of a person who tested positive or someone with the following symptoms including: fever 100.4 F. or above or sudden onset of cough or sudden onset of shortness of breath, for at least 15 minutes or more.
  • COVID-19 Illness Severity:
    • Mild Illness: Individuals who have any of the various signs and symptoms of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, sore throat, malaise, headache, muscle pain) without shortness of breath, dyspnea, or abnormal chest imaging.
    • Moderate Illness: Individuals who have evidence of lower respiratory disease by clinical assessment/imaging, and a saturation of oxygen (SpO2) ≥94% on room air at sea level.
    • Severe Illness: Individuals who have respiratory frequency >30 breaths per minute, SpO2 <94% on room air at sea level (or, for patients with chronic hypoxemia, a decrease from baseline of >3%), ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) <300 mmHg, or lung infiltrates >50%.
    • Critical Illness: Individuals who have respiratory failure, septic shock, and/or multiple organ dysfunction.

When quarantine and isolation are over

  • Discontinuation from self-isolation for a symptomatic case with mild to moderate illness (confirmed or probable)
    • Symptom-based strategy: an individual can end self-isolation if it has been at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared AND no fever for at least 24 hours (without the use of fever-reducing medications) AND other symptoms have improved (e.g., cough has improved).
    • Test-based strategy: Except for rare situations, a test-based strategy is no longer recommended to determine when to discontinue isolation. Please refer to DHHS and ICAP for guidance in rare situations.
  • Discontinuation from self-isolation for an asymptomatic laboratory-confirmed case who is not immunocompromised:
    • Time-based strategy: isolation should continue until at least 10 days have passed since the date of the positive test AND no symptom development. For 3 days following discontinuation of isolation, the individual should practice strict social distancing and wear a facemask. If they develop symptoms, then a symptom-based should be substituted.
  • Discontinuation of self-isolation for cases with severe to critical illness or immunocompromised:
    • Symptomatic: At least 20 days after symptom onset AND at least 24 hours have passed since last fever (without the use of fever-reducing medications) AND symptoms have improved.
    • Asymptomatic: At least 20 days have passed since the date of their positive test.
  • Return to work for HCP who experienced mild illness and are not severely immunocompromised
    • Except for rare situations, a test-based strategy is no longer recommended to determine when to discontinue isolation. HCP should follow “symptom-based" criteria or “time-based" criteria (if asymptomatic) to discontinue isolation.
  • Return to work for HCP who experienced severe to critical illness or who are severely immunocompromised
    • Symptomatic: At least 20 days have passed since symptoms first appeared and at least 24 hours have passed since their last fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and symptoms have improved.
    • Asymptomatic: At least 20 days have passed since the date of their positive test.
  • Discontinuation of self-monitoring and self-quarantine
    • Self-quarantine and self-monitoring may stop if after 14 days from most recent exposure, there has been NO development of respiratory illness symptoms.
  • Discontinuation of quarantine for household members of a person with COVID-19 who is under self-isolation and you can separate:
    • Start date of quarantine is the date the COVID-19 case began home isolation and then continuing for 14 days.
  • Discontinuation of quarantine for household members of a person with COVID-19 who is under self-isolation and you CANNOT separate:
    • Start date of quarantine is the date the COVID-19 case ends home isolation and then continuing for 14 days.
  • Recently exposed to COVID-19, but have had COVID-19 within the past 3 months:
    • People who have tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to 3 months as long as they do not develop symptoms again. People who develop symptoms again within 3 months of their first COVID-19 infection may need to be tested again if there is no other cause identified for their symptoms.